Urvanity Art 2020

By Emma Regolini

February 21st , 2020

Urvanity Art Fair is back for 2020! Living up to its incredible legacy, this year’s has an impressive line up of artists from around the world!

The event brings together creatives from urban, street art, graffiti spheres. In its fourth rotation, Urvanity has become a meeting point for collectors, artists and likeminded individuals to collectively celebrate contemporary art.

Artist: D*Face

Sergio Sancho, the founder of the Madrid based festival says that ‘Urvanity’ began with his passion for art and his mission to increase visibility for artists from non-traditional backgrounds who are breaking boundaries, literally and figuratively. 

Artist: Artez

Known for being Spain’s birthplace for artistic movements, Madrid has a rich artistic history to celebrate, from graffiti to lowbrow, neo-pop and urban contemporary influences. This year Urvanity will spread across 30 galleries showcasing more than 90 artists from around the world.

Artist: Martin Gordopelota

This year the art event will place an emphasis on the presence of international galleries partaking including Le Feuvre & Roze (France), MAGMA (Italy), PADRE Gallery (United States), Pantocrator Gallery (China) and Artrust (Switzerland), which will present works by the inimitable, Banksy.

Artist: Cranio

The event program will not only include an incredible showcase of artworks from a range of disciplines but also a series of panel discussions debating topics surrounding the concept of new contemporary art.

Artist: Cayetena H. Cuyás

With an impressive line-up of galleries and artists, Urvanity, for it’s fourth consecutive year continues to establish itself as a key player in the art fair circuit and a gathering place for some of the best and up-and-coming creative minds.

Artist: Sergio Mora

Urvanity 2020 will present an exciting program filled with activities, talks and round table discussions. Global Street Art has been invited present an insightful talk about ‘Walls and words.’  The talk will explore the power of social media and communication tools in expanding the world of urban and contemporary art! We are excited to support Urvanity in 2020 and beyond! Let the art fair begin!

Artist: PECA

Adapting street art in the digital age with INSA

By Emma Regolini

February 14th , 2020

Bristol born artist INSA has a rich history of creative projects before hitting the sweet spot with his iconic Gif-iti style of work, which he is best known for today. Before focusing on his labour-intensive animated murals, INSA has designed signature collections with Kangol and Kid Robot as well as private commissions for clients including Nike and Sony.

Today, INSA’s work is accessible around the world thanks to the internet. Upon reflecting about how his work is consumed online, including reduced pixels and low quality image resolutions, INSA decided to convert his murals into gif animations, best enjoyed online.

The process behind his hypnotising motion graphics involves re-working, re-painting and re-photographing layers of a mural and then converting them into a looped animation. The layers build colours, shapes, geometrics and dimension compositions, which allows a full story to unfold when the final animation is completed.

INSA’s murals align perfectly with the tumblr, tik-tok and instagram generations of the current digital age.

While his work is carried out in the physical world, his art can only be enjoyed through digital means. Through his augmented-reality ‘Gif-iti-‘ app, INSA makes it accessible to “experience the work firsthand through different viewing platforms.” Unlike other detailed and large scale murals that are best viewed IRL, INSA flips the coin, allowing anyone around the world to enjoy his work at any time.

What could be considered, one of his most impressive pieces to date is his collaboration with Ballantine on a satellite scale floor mural covering 57,515 square metres. With a team of 20 and a satellite 431 miles above the earth, INSA wanted to create the world’s largest GIF. Inspired by his trademark ‘Looking For Love’ design, the team worked to get the floor piece completed over four days in Rio de Janeiro in 2015.

The ethereal work of Polish muralist Natalia Rak

By Emma Regolini

January 31, 2020

You may recognise the work of Natalia Rak from her gradient blending, ethereal murals spread across the world and Instagram. The Polish born muralist studied graphic, screen-printing and poster design but later on began to focus on painting and larger scale projects.

Growing up in a small Polish village, Natalia often recounts the absence of street art in her physical surroundings. Today she draws inspiration from mythology, religious symbols and fables.

Today it is widely agreed that Natalia’s murals appear to transcend their physical environments. Rak’s use of symbolism and references to fable-like iconography adds a tangible element of magic to her work. Natalia often cites her deep connection to nature and the importance of protecting endangered species, flora and fauna.

Rak’s murals often portray women from an ethereal perspective. Carving her own space in the street art arena, the Polish muralist says that as a female artist, she understands the complex nature of what it is to be a woman.

Rak also explains that she is more interested in created figures with often-androgynous faces, focusing on their expression and form rather than traditional portrayals of females and males (in Eastern European cultures).

Despite the recurring presence of females in her work, Natalia says that there were not many female street artists to look up to years ago. In what could be considered a male-dominated space, Natalia hopes to be as skilled as her male counterparts while forging her own path and style.

Rak’s work and murals have been included in numerous group exhibitions around the world since 2009. In past interviews Natalia highlights the duality of sharing your work on social media as an artist while remaining inspired and continually creating. She says it is important to share high quality images of your work, sharing the process and how pieces are created

Odeith and the Rise of Anamorphic Street Art

By Emma Regolini

January 17, 2020

Anamorphism in street art refers to the intentional distortion of perspective, a type of optical illusion that is best viewed from a particular vantage point to experience the true image.

Early use of anamorphism or the ‘distorted perspective,’ dates back to prehistoric cave painting, as artists had to adapt to the oblique angles of cave structures. Over time the technique has been revived and used for different purposes suited to the climate of the era.

In the 17th century, anamorphosis was used to conceal images for privacy or personal safety or to hide secrets particularly associated with royal figures.

Anamorphism used in 17th century fine art paintings
Anamorphism used in 17th century fine art paintings

Today, artists use anamorphism by selecting a specific angle from which to view the piece in or take the best photograph, and for Portuguese artist, Odeith, this often involves calculated 90-degree angles or curved surfaces.

Image via https://www.odeith.com/
Image via https://www.odeith.com/
Image via https://www.odeith.com/

Although the style of 3D art is well established, Odeith has driven and refined the anamorphic style, playing with optical illusions by creating life-like scenes involving creatures, cars, chrome lettering and other realistic objects.

Combining mathematical measurements, shadows and at times an imitated background, Odeith achieves, what he refers to as his ‘sombre 3D,’ style.

It is easy to overlook the detail and skill of Odeith’s work until we are shown the piece from a more conventional angle before we can understand how the design is perfectly stretched and distorted to achieve the perfect shot.

The Portuguese artist is most renowned for his abandoned bus illusion mural piece, which quickly became a viral sensation. After coming across a block-like structure, Odeith eventually unveiled the incredibly realistic bus.

Odeith’s style is one, which is so unique and restrictive to imitation that his portfolio of work from over the years continues to push boundaries and inspire artists across the world.